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Bread in Medieval Staffordshire

 

During Medieval times, grain was grown and stored locally.  Millers would have produced flour for the local community and the grain from which the flour was produced would need to be sufficient to last all year, until the next harvest.

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Bread in Saxon Staffordshire

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Baking Bread in Roman Times

Roman millers used rotary querns for most milling purposes.  Saddle querns were used for small scale milling in early roman times.  Milling grain was a labour intensive process and often slaves were used to mill on an industrial scale. 

Grains used – Polish Wheat, Emmer Wheat, Spelt Wheat and Khorasan Wheat.

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Baking Bread in Tudor Times

Flour for baking was always milled as wholemeal flour – on millstones turned by water power or wind power.  The yearly harvest needed to be sufficient for all local needs for the whole year as imported flour was very expensive and difficult to obtain.

Grains used – Common Wheat, Clubwheat, Emmer Wheat, Rye, Barley, Oats, Pea seeds.

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Baking Bread in Georgian Times

Between 1714 and 1830, the Georgian era and the Regency period saw changes in bread baking.  This was a time of invention and ingenuity which saw a shift to modern living that would be recognised today.

Grains used – Common Wheat, Soft Wheat (now also known as Canadian Wheat).

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Bread in Victorian Staffordshire

 

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Baking Bread in War Time

Paul Pursglove 16/04/14

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Mow Cop - Wayside Ovens.

Paul Pursglove 16/04/2014

 

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